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History, Whose History? The Battle for the School Curriculum

In March 2023, the UK government will report on the action plan announced in Inclusive Britain, its response to proposals made by the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities.

The Commission, set up in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests, made a number of sensible suggestions. But that on the history curriculum could irrevocably damage the teaching of history in English schools. If followed it threatens to detract from the broad and balanced teaching of British history from antiquity to our own times. By introducing  a ‘model curriculum’ and providing specific teaching resources, it will impose today’s politicised preoccupations onto pupils’ understanding of the past.

Politeia’s new publication, History, Whose History? The Battle for the School Curriculum
by three historians addresses this problem. Publication will be marked by a conference where the authors will analyse the government’s proposals and make recommendations. They will consider the questions raised for the history curriculum and what government policy should be. Speaking will be:

  • Professor David Abulafia LittD, FBA, Gonville and Caius College and Professor Emeritus of Mediterranean History, Cambridge;
  • Dr Daniel Robinson, Fellow of Policy, Dept for Levelling Up;
  • Baroness Lawlor (Dr Sheila Lawlor), Founder and Research Director, Politeia.

Speakers will introduce the themes in the new publication, addressing the wider themes and touch on such questions as: –

  • What is the current remit for British, European and world history and how are these taught under the present curriculum ?
  • Should teaching the history of this country from the Romans to the present day remain, with almost half the marks at GCSE be awarded for knowing and understanding Britain’s history?
  • Do the present arrangements respect professional freedom?
  • What impact would the proposed changes have?
  • Can the aims of inclusive history be met under the present curriculum
  • What should government policy for the history curriculum be?

If you would like to attend, please email programme@politeia.co.uk, giving your name, position, organisation and daytime contact number.